How To Make A Pot Protector

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Pot protectors are a nifty way to keep your pots and pans from getting scratched up, but they can be expensive or impossible to find. I know because I have been on the hunt for them! I finally gave up when it dawned on me that I could absolutely figure out how to make pot protectors myself – making my cooking life so much easier and happier! Do you ever wish you had a little protection for your pots and pans? If you’re anything like me, you don’t want to be dealing with scratched cookware on the regular. The food sticks, it’s hard to clean, and, frankly, I spent a good amount on those pots and pans so seeing them beat-up just makes me sad. I mean, if you’re like me, you spent a lot of time hunting around to find an awesome new pot set that you really love cooking with. Plus, I wanted my pots to stop banging, stop scratching and just, really sit together more nicely in the cabinet so it was less of a hassle finding what I need.

So, if you want to protect your favorite pans and pots from bumps and scratches, a pot protector just seems like a no-brainer. Making them is quick, easy, and inexpensive – and absolutely customizable for whatever size pots and pans you happen to have! Seriously, the best part about this project is that you can customize the size, color, and pattern of the fabric to match any home decor style or personality. You can also use these as trivets or placemats when they’re not protecting your pans. Dual-use for the win! Sounds like something worth doing? Are you ready to tackle making them yourself? Grab your scissors and let’s get crafty!

How To Make A Pot Protector

What You’ll Need:

How To Make A Pot Protector

First on this how to make a pot protector sewing tutorial, trace the outer edge of each of your round baking dishes plus ¼-inch onto the back of each of your fabrics, then cut them out.

This will leave you with one circle in each size in each piece of fabric type. Set aside.

Next, to make the handle loops, cut 3 pieces of Fabric A for handles with this dimension: 1-inch by 2 ½-inches.

You’ll then want to fold the rectangle in half lengthwise then press this in place.

Once it’s pressed, unfold the rectangle then fold the two long edges inward toward the pressed fold. Press this in place again – leaving you with some very neat edges.

Now on this how to make a pot protector sewing tutorial, fold the rectangle in half lengthwise again (do not unfold first) and press this in place again. You should now have a very thin rectangle with pressed edges on both sides.

Pin the rectangle as pressed and hem along the exposed folded edge. The one handle is complete for now. So just repeat the steps above to make two more handle loops. Set all of the handles aside.

Back to the circles of fabric, working with one size circle set at a time, place the felt circle on your table, followed by placing the same size circle of Fabric A right-side down on top of the felt circle, lined-up nicely.

Place one of the prepared handle loops on the edge of the circle of Fabric A, with both ends pinned to the edge with the loop laying inside the circle of fabric. Be sure to pin both ends of the loop so that it won’t slip out when you turn the fabric later.

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Place the circle of Fabric B right-side down on top of the Fabric A circle, lined-up nicely; followed by the circle of batting, also lined up nicely. Pin the entire stack of fabric together around the edge.

Mark a spot of about 3 inches wide along the edge of the pinned circle of fabrics, away from the pinned loop location – this is the spot you will leave open when sewing in order to turn the piece. Keep this in mind when you’re sewing – this area is critical to making your pot protectors correctly and having plenty of room will let you turn all that fabric smoothly without too much struggle. We are about halfway through this how to make a pot protector sewing tutorial!

Starting on one end of your marked space, hem from the edge of the fabric inward about ¼-inch, then turn the circle and hem all the way around the circle about ¼-inch from the edge, stopping at your marked location, turning the fabric and working toward the edge. Take care to backstitch over the pinned loop location and the beginning and the end of the hem to avoid the hem unraveling.

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Turn the piece right-side out and press the edge to make it less poofy and clean. Do not skip pressing – it really will make your finished product look more professional in the end.

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Top stitch around the edge of the piece, about ¼-inch in from the edge, all the way around.

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Next on this how to make a pot protector sewing tutorial, using a mason jar lid or another small circle form, trace the shape of the circle into the center of your pot protector.

Then topstitch over the traced circle, to help hold the layer in place.

Repeat to make the two smaller pot protectors then wash and enjoy! And that’s it, seriously! Isn’t it a fun idea?!  Now you know how to make a pot protector sewing tutorial! We all know that pot protectors are a must for any household. Making your own pot protector can save you money and be a fun project for the whole family!  

Easy Sew Pot Protectors

If you liked this how to make a pot protector sewing tutorial, make sure to pin it to your favorite Pinterest board or share it with friends on social media. If you decide to make this simple project on your own, make certain that you take a picture afterward and tag us on social media as we love seeing the fabrics and color choices that people use!

Yield: 1

How To Make A Pot Protector

Pot protector create card

Keep your pots and pans from getting scratched in your cabinets with these easy sew pot protectors. Pick out some cute fabric to protect your investment in your cookware.

Active Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Difficulty Easy
Estimated Cost $3.50

Tools

Instructions

  1. Trace the outer edge of each of your round baking dishes plus ¼-inch onto the back of each of your fabrics, then cut them out. This will leave you with one circle in each size in each piece of fabric type. Set aside.
  2. To make the handle loops, cut 3 pieces of Fabric A for handles with this dimension: 1-inch by 2 ½-inches.
  3. Fold the rectangle in half lengthwise then press this in place.
  4. Unfold the rectangle then fold the two long edges inward toward the pressed fold. Press this in place.
  5. Fold the rectangle in half lengthwise again (do not unfold first) and press this in place again.
  6. Pin the rectangle as pressed and hem along the exposed folded edge. Repeat making two more handle loops. Set aside.
  7. Working with one size circle set at a time, place the felt circle on your table, followed by placing the same size circle of Fabric A right-side down on top of the felt circle, lined-up nicely.
  8. Place one of the prepared handle loops on the edge of the circle of Fabric A, with both ends pinned to the edge with the loop laying inside the circle of fabric. Be sure to pin both ends of the loop so that it won’t slip out when you turn the fabric later.
  9. Place the circle of Fabric B right-side down on top of the Fabric A circle, lined-up nicely; followed by the circle of batting, also lined up nicely. Pin the entire stack of fabric together around the edge.
  10. Mark a spot of about 3 inches wide along the edge of the pinned circle of fabrics, away from the pinned loop location - this is the spot you will leave open when sewing in order to turn the piece.
  11. Starting on one end of your marked space, hem from the edge of the fabric inward about ¼-inch, then turn the circle and hem all the way around the circle about ¼-inch from the edge, stopping at your marked location, turning the fabric and working toward the edge.
  12. Enjoy!

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1 thought on “How To Make A Pot Protector”

  1. In step 7, shouldn’t circle A be placed right side UP on top of the felt circle? Of you put circle A right side down, you will be sewing the right side of circle B to the wrong sideof circle A, and the finished item will havd the wrong side kf the fabric on one side.

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