How to Make a Camper Potholder with Pattern

How to Make a Camper Potholder with Pattern

When we downsized, we REALLY downsized, which has been a blessing. But, then I started cooking more and, frankly, I needed more potholders than I had originally thought. Two just aren’t enough with a bigger family. Towels are great, but those have a specific use, too, and too often they’re already in use! I just needed more potholders. So I figured out why not make some that are a reflection of the happiest camper. After a few sketches, I decided to make a “Happiest Camper Potholder” to reflect our logo. You can follow our tutorial on how to make a camper potholder with pattern because they’re too cute not to make. It’s so fun and simple, I definitely think I’m making some for Christmas gifts. If you’re ready to make an adorable camper potholder for yourself or to gift, let’s get started.

Supplies for Camper Potholder

Camper Supplies

A few notes on the supplies: For fabric, I got remnants from the local craft store, because it was significantly cheaper than buying it off the rack, plus there was enough of the remnant that I could make several potholders or other projects. For the floral fabric, which could be any fabric of your choosing, but I thought this pretty floral fabric that matched my logo, which made me happy. Scraps of black and yellow craft felt. And when I say “scraps” I mean just the smallest bits are necessary. You don’t have to use a rotary cutter and mat but I found it much easier for cutting.

How to Make a Camper Potholder

trace camper pattern

To make a camper potholder, start by clicking here and printing out the camper potholder pattern if you haven’t already done that. Then you can start with the water-soluble sewing pencil and tracing the patterns on the fabrics. Note that some of the shapes have more of rustic or worn feel in the patter that is to mimic my happiest camper logo if you don’t want that feel you can freehand those shapes.

Cut the camper shape from the floral fabric and the grey fabric. Also cut the large rectangle (door) shape from the beige fabric, two curtain shapes from the yellow craft felt, one circle shape (tire) from the grey fabric, one medium rectangle (window) shape from the grey fabric, one small rectangle (hitch/loop) shape from the grey fabric, and one much smaller circle shape (of your choice size) to be the inner part of the tire.

laying fabric of crampers together

Once all of your pieces are cut out, place the floral fabric and the grey fabric camper shapes face-to-face and pin in place.

Mark, with your water-soluble sewing pencil, a 2-3 -inch wide space along the hem at the front of the camper, note you will not be hemming this marked space in this first pass. As you need a hole to insert the poly-fil.

Starting at the end of that mark, begin hemming along the edge of the camper shape. Go all the way around the camper edge and then end your hem at the beginning of the mark. Remember you are not sewing the 2-3 inches you marked, you are hemming around the rest of the camper.

trun inside out

Turn your camper shape right side out. Be careful to be gentle with the seam at the opening and don’t pull too hard or you’ll rip the seam right out.

Iron Camper cutout

Iron the camper shape, paying careful attention to the edges and getting it nice and straight. I made the mistake of ironing it in such a way that hid the upper corner and the tire area. So, I had to go back and iron those later. Just be careful.

Fold the edges in on the door shape, window shape, loop shape, and the tire shape and iron them in place. This will make hemming them so much easier. Be very careful with these small pieces. If you’re concerned that they will not be easy to handle or will stick to your iron, place the pieces under a piece of parchment paper, then iron.

With the hole, you left in the hem of the camper shape layers, stuff the camper shape with a small amount of poly-fil. The goal is to create a layer of poly-fil for insulation, don’t stuff it full like a pillow. Spread it out and get it all over in the camper potholder, but make sure all areas have some poly-fil.

stuffing flat

Iron the camper shape again, paying careful attention to smooshing down the polyfill. It will be very hard to attach the other pieces and not have it look like a pillow if you have too much polyfill. If it’s still too puffy after this step, remove some polyfill from the camper potholder. 

tire pin

Pin the tire onto the floral fabric camper shape, where the tire is supposed to be.  Sew the tire in place. Pin the small circle of black felt to the center of the tire and sew in place.

Pin doors and sew

Using pins, tack the camper door in place. Hem the edges of the door in place on top of the camper shape.

Sewing Window

Pin the window shape onto the camper shape, then hem the edges in place. Place the curtains in place over the window and hem them in place.

Run a hem along the edges of the loop shape. Pin the loop shape in a loop on the front of the camper shape, in the hole you left in the hem. Fold the hem over in the hole and pin in place.

closing sew

Run a hem along the exterior of the camper, closing the hole, affixing the loop, and also around the entire camper edge. Trim all loose thread ends. Iron once again, to further smooth out the polyfill.

Camper Potholder pattern

And done! It’s seriously that easy to put this cute camper potholder together. It’s like making a tiny quilt, but better because you can hold pots with it and you’re not limited to only using it during the winter. And, because of the polyfill inside, you can rely on this potholder to last for some time against heat. The pockets of air between the layers will help protect one’s hands. Which is the whole point of a potholder, right?!

Camper Potholder

Then, the bonus is, my friends who are also part of the camper-life, they need Christmas gifts this year and rather than bringing a boring gift, I’m going to bring them a set of cute camper potholders! 

If you loved this potholder tutorial or the free camper potholder pattern, be sure to pin it to your favorite sewing projects board on Pinterest!

Yield: 1

Camper Pot Holder & Pattern

Camper Pot Holder & Pattern

Easy to make Camper Pot holder and camper pattern. I made sure to choose fabric and colors to make this look like our Happiest Camper Logo. I love how easy this step by step sewing tutorial is.

Prep Time 2 minutes
Active Time 20 minutes
Total Time 22 minutes
Difficulty Easy
Estimated Cost $10.00

Materials

Instructions

  1. Cut the camper shape from the floral fabric and the grey fabric.
  2. Cut out the large rectangle (door) shape from the beige fabric.
  3. Cut out two curtain shapes from the yellow craft felt.
  4. Cut out one circle shape (tire) from the grey fabric.
  5. Cut out one medium rectangle (window) shape from the grey fabric.
  6. Cut out one small rectangle (hitch/loop) shape from the grey fabric.
  7. Cut out one much smaller circle shape (of your choice size) to be the inner part of the tire.
  8. Place the floral fabric and the grey fabric camper shapes face-to-face and pin in place.
  9. Mark, with a water-soluble sewing marker or pencil, a 2-3 -inch wide space along the hem at the front of the camper, that you will not be hemming in this first pass.
  10. Starting at the end of that mark, begin hemming along the edge of the camper shape. Go all the way around the camper edge and then end your hem at the beginning of the mark.
  11. Turn your camper shape right side out.
  12. Iron the camper shape, paying careful attention to the edges and getting it nice and straight.
  13. Fold the edges in on the door shape, window shape, loop shape, and the tire shape and iron them in place. This will make hemming them so much easier.
  14. With the hole, you left in the hem of the camper shape layers, stuff the camper shape with a tiny amount of polyfill. The goal is to create a layer of polyfill, not stuff it full like a pillow, so spread it out and get it all over, but make the layer as thin as possible.
  15. Iron the camper shape again, paying careful attention to smooshing down the polyfill.
  16. Pin the tire onto the floral fabric camper shape, where the tire is supposed to be. 
  17. Hem the tire in place.
  18. Pin the small circle of black felt to the center of the tire and hem in place.
  19. Using pins, tack the camper door in place.
  20. Hem the edges of the door in place on top of the camper shape.
  21. Pin the window shape onto the camper shape, then hem the edges in place.
  22. Place the curtains in place over the window and hem them in place.
  23. Run a hem along the edges of the loop shape.
  24. Pin the loop shape in a loop on the front of the camper shape, in the hole you left in the hem.
  25. Fold the hem over in the hole and pin in place.
  26. Run a hem along the exterior of the camper, closing the hole, affixing the loop, and also around the entire camper edge.
  27. Trim all loose thread ends.
  28. Iron once again, to further smooth out the polyfill.
  29. Enjoy your camper Pot Holder!

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5 thoughts on “How to Make a Camper Potholder with Pattern”

  • Adorable!!! Okay, so after just finishing 3 1/2 years camping (first in our 27′ Coleman with NO slides, then our 41′ Heartland Charleston Landmark 365), I HAVE TO feature your sweet camper pot holder! Thanks for the fun tutorial. It’ll post up this coming Wednesday at Share Your Style #227, thank you!

    Happy fall and enjoy your camping! p.s. Remember to the water drip a bit in ALL sinks when it’s below 32 degrees and drain the refrigerator ice maker line (it’ll freeze unless you insulate wrap it). Plus, we found that keeping a string of Christmas lights underneath and a heating pad on the water heater pump helps to keep from losing your water heater pump due to freezing).

    Hugs,
    Barb

  • Oh my goodness!!! This is super adorable!! If I was into camping, I would definitely NEED one of these! Thanks so much for sharing your project over at The House That Stamps Built.

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